It’s important to understand how the different types of alcohol that you drink may impact you in different ways. This is especially important when considering whether or not you should drive after having a drink.

Researchers have looked into it to see how fast different types of alcohol “hit you” by being absorbed into your bloodstream. What they found was that the fastest absorption happened when people drank alcohol that was not diluted at all. This could mean taking a shot, for instance, or having a “neat” drink.

The second-fastest absorption for most of the test subjects came when they drank alcohol that was cut with something carbonated. For instance, drinking alcohol that was mixed with diet soda or even carbonated water would help the body take in the alcohol quickly.

The slowest absorption came when people mixed their drinks with still water. This is not necessarily a common mixer, as it does not change the taste much and people often don’t want watered-down alcohol. However, some drinks are often served with ice. They could be most potent at the beginning, when they are essentially undiluted, but could become less potent as the ice melts.

If you thought you were sober enough to drive and felt surprised when your BAC came back as being over the legal limit, the reason could lie in how fast the alcohol was absorbed. That’s why you need to pay attention to what you drink and when you drink it. Not all drinks are created equal.

Regardless, if you get arrested, it’s crucial to know what legal defense options you have.